March Madness for Trouser Patterns


I've always found March to be an odd, transitional month. It's not quite winter - heck, it can be in the sixties on some days here in the northeast - but it's definitely not spring - I've been skiing many days in March. 

This dichotomy often presents wardrobe problems for me, and that's when separates are the best. Layers, layers and more layers. So for March, I personally believe pants are the best options, and that means that we've chosen three lovely trouser patterns for your sewing pleasure.

   

If you've been paying close attention to the boxes, we are in the process of helping you build a wardrobe. Each month, you'll get a staple, or a statement piece, and by the end of the year, you'll have a closet full of lovely, wearable, me-made items. And though some may be daunted by the idea of trousers, they are very much an essential part of a wardrobe. I admire the people who can wear skirts and dresses everyday, but I am not one of them. So, trouser patterns it is.

So, here's the rundown of your options:

Lightweight Box: Marigold Trousers by Tilly and the Buttons

 

To help with some of the trepidation surrounding making trousers, I've specifically included an easier, fly-less pattern. If you've made pajama pants, this is the next step for you. No fretting over your crotch measurements, no figuring out if you're an L or a J, just simple, loose-fitting pants you can dress up and dress down to your heart's content. These peg-shaped trousers are comfy (hello, elastic waistband); they're stylish, and, on top of that, they're very on trend right now. No matter which way you look at it, they're a great addition to your sewing repertoire and your wardrobe.

Now, full disclosure time. Anyone familiar with the pattern knows you can also make a jumpsuit with this pattern. However, because this is the trouser theme, we're only providing the fabric for the trousers themselves. If you want more fabric to do the full jumpsuit, we always have the fabric for sale by the yard. 

Disclaimer aside, let's talk fabrics.

 

  • Triangle Stripe Rayon Challis - I love rayon challis. It's cool to the touch, soft, drapable and easier to sew than silk but with almost the same look. This challis has a little more heft to it than others, which makes it a good option for these trousers which require a bottomweight fabric with drape. On top of that, the pattern is just darling. Jade Green triangles on a black background run in alternating stripes, creating a chevron effect without being over the top. For people who are a little wary of patterned pants, this is a great choice because the stripes add length to the leg and the darker colors don't overwhelm the eye. Quite simply, a beautiful fabric option.
  • Navy Viscose Twill - You can't go wrong with navy trousers, amirite? Endlessly versatile and also slimming, I always prefer darker colors for trousers so I can pair them with more vibrant tops. This viscose twill is luxuriously soft to the touch, which means your pants will become secret pajamas, and the drape is perfect for the pattern. You will want to wear these trousers everyday once you make them.
  • Black and White Feather Print Pebble Crepe - While crepe might not be warm enough for March, trousers made out of this lightweight fabric will be an amazing addition to your warm weather wardrobe. The surface of the fabric has a textured feel which adds visual intrigue. Plus, the fun, feather print will make your trousers the envy of others. Just imagining the finished result makes me smile. A great option for an adventurous beginner.

Medium Weight Box: Sasha Trousers by Closet Case Patterns

I'm going to admit upfront that I had another pattern planned for this box. I even bought the patterns. Then Closet Case Patterns released this trousers, and I immediately scrapped my whole plan.

Anyone familiar with the company's Ginger Jeans knows that Closet Case knows their bottoms. (Hehe, bottoms) Their fitting is impeccable, their instructions are easy to follow, and the end result is always something you love to wear.

To quote the website: 

"The Sasha Trousers are a polished wardrobe staple. Featuring classic tailored details, a flattering mid-rise with a contour waistband, slim, tapered leg and a comfortable stretch fit, these are wear-everywhere pants that can easily move from day to night."

I really can't say it any better than that. So let's talk fabric.

 

  • Lipstick Pink Double-Faced Woven - I'm starting bold with this fabric selection. I know that pink trousers are not everyone's cup of tea, but if you're in the other camp, the idea of hot pink trousers make you squee a little. I'm firmly in the latter camp. Just the thought of making these pants with this fabric excites me. The fabric itself is a nice medium weight with an all-over stretch that's perfect for these trousers. A cotton-poly blend makes them wearable and durable. So, come on, and let your pink side show.
  • Black Brown Polyester Twill - If you want to make a pair of trousers that you'll wear with everything and that will last you for years, this is your fabric choice. From afar, this fabric looks like a sateen, but the twill weave will give away the durability of the fabric. Smooth, flexible and versatile, this fabric choice is a no-brainer if you want a wardrobe staple.
  • Turtledove and Black Geometric Stretch Cotton Jacquard - Let me state upfront that this fabric is reversible. I repeat, it's freaking reversible. You have the option to make lovely pair of black trousers covered in cream micro-triangles OR you can make a bold pair of cream trousers speckled with black triangles. It's entirely up to you. No matter which you choose, you'll get a fabric with a tailored drape, a remarkable amount of stretch and a soft hand. Personally, I can't wait to sew my own pair.

Heavyweight Box: Thurlow Trousers by Sewaholic Patterns

I love Sewaholic Patterns because they design specifically for pear shapes, which I definitely am. They are also one of the first pattern companies I used, so I probably hold a little soft spot in my heart for them, especially now that they are no longer producing new patterns.

I realize that this pattern has been around forever. However, in my mind, that makes them a definite "tried and true." The pants themselves are wide-legged (though that can changed), fitted through the hips. They also feature back welt-pockets and front slash pockets, with easy-to-follow instructions for both.

Because the pattern has been around for so long, I wanted to take the fabric choices up a notch. That way if you've already made a pair in a simple twill, you can branch out with a more luxury fabric and not feel like you're treading the same ground. 

  • Heather Blue Cotton-Tencel Brushed Flannel -  Once I saw this fabric, I couldn't get the idea of a lighter, muted blue pair of pants. There's something so alluring about the thought: they're not too bright, but bold enough that others will notice. Plus, this fabric is deliciously soft (thank you, tencel). It also as a lovely soft yet tailored drape that will just flow beautifully over your hips with that pattern. Pair it with a bateau top and feel quite Parisian with this choice.
  • Charcoal Grey Virgin Wool Suiting - If you need a pair of trousers for work, this is your choice. Virgin wool is one of the softest wools out there, and this fabric is no exception. An extraordinary hand is enhanced further by a tight weave which renders the fabric completely opaque and beautifully sleek. Feel like a boss with these bespoke trousers.
  • Black and White Herringbone Wool Blend - Create a timeless pair of trousers when you choose this herringbone fabric. With a soft hand and a flexible draper, this fabric is a step up from the ordinary. And you want to know the best part? Up close, there are little multi-colored flecks that are speckled across the fabric which add a unique element to anything you make. If you're looking to make a pair of dressy trousers, you can't go wrong with this choice.

So that's it, folks! Our March boxes in a nutshell. Head over to the product pages for more details about difficulty levels and what else is included in the boxes. 

Happy sewing!

-Mary

 


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